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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
. while the stock exchanges get back to business, the federal government is getting down to business in responding to the widespread disaster. sylvia hall has the latest on the federal response. >> reporter: as east coast residents survey the mess sandy brought ashore, federal, state and local governments are already coordinating the cleanup. right now, thousands of workers from every level of government are on a rescue mission in new jersey and new york's hardest- hit areas. fema is pulling in generators and working with power companies to get the lights back on. the storm's damage was so severe that president obama quickly declared major disasters in new york and new jersey overnight. the decision frees up federal dollars to help families and businesses recover their losses. it also allows the u.s. to reimburse local and state governments for some of the expenses they'll face as they rebuild. the east coast may be cleaning up, but sandy isn't finished. the storm is plowing inland, dumping snow across the appalachians. with sandy still churning, it's near impossible tonohow extensiv
u.s. economy picks up steam thanks to sp. ding by consumers and the government. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. we take you to a wells fargo event in chicago, where housing grants could turn renters into buyers. >> tom: then, from tax hikes to corporate earnings worries,o tonight's "market monitor" guest says investors are facing a cliff of concern. robert stovall of wood asset manament joins us. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."!me >> tom: the u.s. economy actually sped up in the third quarter, surprising economists and maybe you too. thanks to a pick-up in spending by conumers, the federal government and the housing c sector, the gross domestic product grew at a 2% annual rate in july through september. that 2% pace was stronger than expected and much better than what the economy experienced in the second quarter. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at the data and what it suggests about the economy the final months of this year. >> reporter: an economy growing at a 2% annual rate is hardly anything to celebrate. sure it could've been worse. but, clearly at three-years post gr
, federal, and local governments. and so we're confident that the assets are prepositioned for an effective response in the aftermath of the storm. r david paulison knows about mobilizing the federal government's response to a hurricane. he was in two weeks after hurricane katrina. are you confident that fema is prepared given the sheer size of this storm, almost a thousand miles in dimer. >> it is a huge storm and the impact will on the storm is so big, it is impacti sever states from dall the way up to maine at the same time. but i am rae very comfortable. we have a great administrator running the organization. he gets it, he's from florida, a good emergency manager. doesn't run around with his hair on fire. so i'm confident they will do a good job. >> on a conference call today n fact, your successor, mr. fugate said the disaster fund at fema has a billion dollars in t more or less. is that enough for this kind of response that will be necessary? >> probably at the end of the day the expenses will be more than that. but yes, it's enough for now. what the president has de, he psident has
and businesses. and governments will be spending huge amounts of money to repair subways, roads, and bridges so all of those efforts should help boost economic activity early next year. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: joining us now for a closer look at sandy's economic impact, mark zandi, chief economist at moody's analytics. you know, mark, people often hear that when there's a sdater like zandi, that it's actually a boost to the economy. is that going to be true in this case? >> well, no. this is a natural disaster. disasters are bad for the economy. obviously, the big hit to the economy initially, is what we're seing in new york. you do get rebuilding, and economy benefits from that, but net, net, the economy is in a worse place. natural disasters are bad for the economy, not good. >> susie: you heard in erica's remit some businesses are going to benefit, maybe hox*echl builders and cuk companies. if you look at the economy, who are the winners and losers in terms of various sectors? >> well, there's more losers than winners. the losers would be the restaurants, they're not goin
-up in spending by consumers, the federal government and the housing sector, the gross domestic product grew at a 2% annual rate in july through september. that 2% pace was stronger than expected and much better than what the economy experienced in the second quarter. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at the data and what it suggests about the economy in the final months of this year. >> reporter: an economy growing at a 2% annual rate is hardly anything to celebrate. sure it could've been worse. but, clearly at three-years post great recession, it should be a lot better. experts call it a side-ways economy, one that is unable to create enough jobs to bring down the nation's stubborn unemployment rate. but, people on the streets of new york have different takes on what a 2% economy means to them: >> it means first of all that anyone trying to look for employment is going have a tough time but don't give up. i myself was out of work for eight months, before i got my present job, but i just hung in there. >> right now, for us middle class folks, that probably doesn't mean much. what that will
stronger than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the k message tre is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the long haul to bring the unemployment rate down, but slowly. >> reporter: one of the best things about this jobs report: payroll gains were broad-based. retailing added 36,000 jobs. health care 31,000 jobs. construction 17,000 jobs. manufacturing shook off its recent losses, adding 13,000 jobs. the unemployment rate did tick up to 7.9%. but even that may be a sign of strength. labor force participation had been falling as older workers retired and others gave up looking for work. over the last two months that trend has re
payroll snapshot is seen as a kind of preview for the government's official employment report, which comes out tomorrow. factoring in job losses in state and local government, adp projects the labor department will likely say the economy created roughly 130,000 jobs in october. barclays ecomist chael gapen expects the unemployment rate will hold steady tomorrow at 7.8%. and gapen expects the pattern of moderate job gains over the last year will be the pattern for the coming year, too. >> 150,000 to 160,000 jobs a month may not be a bang-out kind of number that gets everybody happy, but it's going to work. it will work in the sense of gradually reducing slack, gradually re-employing the unemployed, and pushing downward the unemployment rate. >> reporter: manufacturing was a soft spot in the adp report, showing a loss of 8,000 jobs. but it was no surprise, given the recent slowing in global sales. >> six out of the ten top markets that we have are seeing a contraction right now. and it is very tough for them to make inroads in terms of increasing exports to those nations. >> reporter: but ho
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)